Hem/Onc Roundup: Experts Discuss Phase 2 Trial of NSCLC Treatment, and More

Is Myeloma Development Associated With Blood Type?

ABO blood groups may play a role in the development and outcomes of multiple myeloma, according to new data published in the Magazine of European Medical Oncology. A research team from Antalya Training and Research Hospital in Antalya, Turkey, conducted a retrospective, observational study to examine the relationship between blood type and development and clinical outcomes for this disease.

Is Myeloma Development Associated With Blood Type?

Dr. Camidge Discusses Launch of Phase 2 Trial Evaluating RAF/MEK Inhibitor in NSCLC

Verastem Oncology recently announced the initiation of the second phase 2 registration-directed clinical trial from its RAMP (Raf And Mek Program). The study, RAMP 202, will evaluate VS-6766 (RAF/MEK inhibitor), alone and in combination with its FAK inhibitor (defactinib), for patients with KRAS-G12V mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director of Thoracic Oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicineand Universityof Colorado Cancer Center, and Andrew Koustenis, Global Program Leader, Verastem Oncology, talked about the launch of the trial in an interview with DocWire News.

Cancer Cells Hibernate to Evade Chemotherapy

To survive chemotherapy, cancer cells enter into a slow-dividing, hibernation-like state as a survival mechanism, according to a study published in the journal Cell.

“The tumor is acting like a whole organism, able to go into a slow-dividing state, conserving energy to help it survive,” says Dr. Catherine O’Brien, who is an Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto.

Cancer Cells Hibernate to Evade Chemotherapy

Opioid Use May Be Linked to Pancreatic Cancer

The use of opioids may increase an individual’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer, according to a new study. Researchers aimed to determine associations between rates of opioid use and pancreatic cancer development in the United States between 1996 and 2016. Data on pancreatic cancer incidence rates in the U.S. were collected and compared with data on opioid-related mortality, a surrogate marker to account for both prescription and illicit opioid use.