Carbon Fiber–Reinforced PEEK Versus Titanium Tibial Intramedullary Nailing: A Preliminary Analysis and Results

This article was originally published here

imageObjectives:
Standard titanium nails (TN) or carbon fiber–reinforced PEEK nails (CFN) were compared to evaluate impact of material on fracture union, healing time, knee/ankle, and barometric pain.
Design:
Longitudinal cohort evaluated retrospectively comparing 2 periods using 2 implant types.
Setting:
Single surgeon series at one Level II Trauma Center.
Patients:
Standardized treatment protocol. Fifty-six tibial fracture patients suitable for intramedullary nailing over 5-year period.
Intervention:
First period—TN; second period—CFN.
Main Outcome:
Measurements: standard demographic data: OTA/AO fracture classification, fracture location, and nail type. Outcome parameters: cumulative healing at standard time intervals, infection/nonunion, associated injuries, knee/ankle, barometric pain, and implant removal. Statistical analysis comparing incident healing.
Results:
Patient populations were not statistically different regarding demographics and fracture type/location, although there was a trend toward greater fracture severity/more associated injuries in CFN group. In 56 patients, 26 received CFN and 30 received TN. Healing rates were reported at each time interval. 8 weeks: TN—0%, CFN—19%; 12 weeks: TN—17%, CFN—69%; 16 weeks: TN—57%, CFN—92%; 20 weeks: TN—87%, CFN—96%; and 24 weeks: TN—97%, CFN—96% (P